Innovation and Inspiration: The Campaign for Kansas University

Research Impact/Bibliometrics

This guide provides an introduction to using Web of Science, Scopus and other resources to determine journal impact factor and individual researcher and article impact.

Finding individual research impact

Researchers often want to know the impact of their individual articles or overall body of research. Two of the most common ways to do this are citation analysis and H-index.

Citation analysis

Citation analysis consists of determining how many times a particular work has been cited by other authors. K-State provides several ways to do this including Web of Science and Scopus. You can also do it in Google Scholar (free).

Any article search in Web of Science provides the number of times the article has been cited:

Scopus does as well:

Remember that they each only list the number of times the article is cited by journals indexed in that database, so the numbers are likely to be different.

Google Scholar does something similar:

Here the times cited is larger, because Google Scholar indexes more sources. On the other hand, the sources may be less scholarly, and may include tables of contents, newspaper articles, etc. For a good comparison of the various strengths and weaknesses, see University of Michigan’s Citation Analysis Guide.

H-Index

 

H-Index:

 

The H-index, created by researcher Jorge E. Hirsch, attempts to measure the total impact of a researcher’s work, while controlling for very frequently cited or very little cited papers. In order to calculate it, the author’s papers are arranged in descending order of times cited. Then the H index is determined by the number of papers in the list (h) that have h or more citations.

In other words, look in the chart for where the number of citations is greater than or equal to the article number.  That article number is the N number.

 

 

This author’s total number of articles is 7 and total number of citations is 140. His/her H-Index is 3, because s/he has 3 articles with 3 or more citations:

 

Article #

# of citations

1

120

2

10

3

4

4

2

5

2

6

2

7

0

This author, with the same total number of articles (7) and citations (140) as the author above, has an H-index of 7, because s/he has 7 articles with 7 or more citations

 

 

Article #

# of citations

1

20

2

20

3

20

4

20

5

20

6

20

7

20

 

 

The H-index is available through Scopus by doing an author search and examining the author's profile (click for more information).

 

Find it in Web of Science by using the "create citation report" feature from an author search.

The Publish or Perish website also provides a way to calculate h-index based on Google Scholar reports. Note that each website is likely to give a different result because it indexes, and calculates based on, different sources.

Other resources

Other databases provide some citation information, including JSTOR, PsycInfo, Sociological Abstracts, PubMed, America History and Life, and Historical Abstracts. Usually, they provide information on times the article has been cited by other articles indexed in that database. For more help with any of these measures, ask a librarian.